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  • SacchoSaccho Posts: 1,577Player
    The testimonials of survivors of the nuclear attacks or the firebombings in Europe are positively horrific. "The Making of the Atomic Bomb" by Richard Rhodes is a very good (and very long) read for anyone interested in the history of that aspect of the war and details some of the ethical quandaries everyone faced. Heck, just learning the sheer scope of what they did... in two years, they built a manufacturing facility larger than the entire US automotive industry's for uranium enrichment. That's incredible. Humanity has proven itself capable of some really incredible things, both good and bad.
  • Dem@nDem@n Posts: 564Player
    edited June 2015
    i live in Budapest,WW2 plane bombs not detonated,granade and gun depos get discovered on a monthly basis whenever the goverment decides to do some construction work within the city,or citizens do contruction work on their buildings.Whole blocks of people get evacuated for days till the bombs get disarmed on the spot depending on size or get shipped to a secure location to get blown up.70 years after the war...
    lets play a little guessing game,ideas what this is?

    B9iDqQCl.jpg

    http://imgur.com/B9iDqQC
  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 617Player
    The guys disarming in budapest must be noobs ;) I live in the most bombed area in ww2,ruhrgebiet,got 2 times evacuated and a few times i wasnt allowed to leave the house.Normally they need a few hours to defuse and at no point it was few days over here.
    AAPG is good!
  • Dem@nDem@n Posts: 564Player
    edited June 2015
    half a day at best,these are armed bombs with a weight of several tons in heavily populated areas couple of meters underground half buried next to gas lines.dream job...
  • Dem@nDem@n Posts: 564Player
    This might not be on topic but interesting for some,weapons used in the Hungarian military in the past 15 years and currently,you can see some heavy russian influence in weapon choices typical for the East Euro parts.

  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 617Player
    2 years ago they found one of these in my area: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockbuster_bomb
    The first picture showing it dropped on my area :)

    A few tons explosives at once.. Must be fun to put a hand on these 70 years old,rusty things.
    AAPG is good!
  • SSKtidididiSSKtidididi Posts: 171Player
    lets play a little guessing game,ideas what this is?

    B9iDqQCl.jpg

    http://imgur.com/B9iDqQC


    It is the part of Panzerschreck.
  • Dem@nDem@n Posts: 564Player
    lets play a little guessing game,ideas what this is?

    B9iDqQCl.jpg

    http://imgur.com/B9iDqQC


    It is the part of Panzerschreck.
    the direction is good but you think small tidi,think big,think this big

    berkovics1.jpg

  • SacchoSaccho Posts: 1,577Player
    edited June 2015
    This was a passage I found extremely moving. The personal testimonies strike me much more deeply than the raw numbers ever could.
    Pathfinders started dropping yellow markers and bombs at fifty-five minutes past midnight on July 28. Five minutes later the main bomber stream arrived. Marking was good and creep-back was slow. Later arrivals began to notice a difference between this raid and others they had flown: "Most of the raids we did looked like gigantic firework displays over the target area," a flight sergeant remarks, "but this was 'the daddy of them all.'" A flight lieutenant distinguishes the difference:

    The burning of Hamburg that night was remarkable in that I saw not many fires but one. Set in the darkness was a turbulent dome of bright red fire, lighted and ignited like the glowing heart of a vast brazier. I saw no flames, no outlines of buildings, only brighter fires which flared like yellow torches against a background of bright red ash. Above the city was a misty red ha.ze. I looked down, fascinated but aghast, satisfied yet horrified. I had never seen a fire like that before and was never to see its like again.

    The summer heat and low humidity, the mix of high-explosive and incendiary bombs that made kindling and then ignited it and the absence of firefighting equipment in the bombed districts conspired to assemble a new horror. An hour after the bombing began the horror had a name, recorded first in the main log of the Hamburg Fire Department: Feuersturm: firestorm. A Hamburg factory worker remembers its beginning, some twenty minutes into the one-hour bombing raid:

    Then a storm started, a shrill howling in the street. It grew into a hurricane so that we had to abandon all hope of fighting the [factory] fire. It was as though we were doing no more than throwing a drop of water on to a hot stone. The whole yard, the canal, in fact as far as we could see, was just a whole, great, massive sea of fire.

    Small fires had coalesced into larger fires and, greedy for oxygen, had sucked air from around the coalescing inferno and fanned further fires there. That created the wind, a thermal column above the city like an invisible chimney above a hearth; the wind heated the fury at the center of the firestorm to more than 1,400 degrees, heat sufficient to melt the windows of a streetcar, wind sufficient to uproot trees. A fifteen-year-old Hamburg girl recalls:

    Mother wrapped me in wet sheets, kissed me, and said, "Run!" I hesitated at the door. In front of me I could see only fire -- everything red, like the door to a furnace. An intense heat struck me. A burning beam fell in front of my feet. I shied back but, then, when I was ready to jump over it, it was whirled away by a ghostly hand. I ran out to the street. The sheets around me acted as sails and I had the feeling that I was being carried away by the storm. I reached . . . a five-storey building in front of which we had arranged to meet again . . . Someone came out, grabbed me by the arm, and pulled me into the doorway.

    The fire filled the air with burning embers and melted the streets, a nineteen-year-old milliner reports:

    We came to the door which was burning just like a ring in a circus through which a lion has to jump. . . . The rain of large sparks, blowing down the street, were each as large as a five-mark piece. I struggled to run against the wind in the middle of the street but could only reach a house on the corner. . . .
    We got to the Löschplatz [park] all right but I couldn't go on across the Eiffestrasse because the asphalt had melted. There were people on the roadway, some already dead, some still lying alive but stuck in the asphalt. They must have rushed on to the roadway without thinking. Their feet had got stuck and then they had put out their hands to try to get out again. They were on their hands and knees screaming.


    The firestorm completely burned out some eight square miles of the city, an area about half as large as Manhattan. The bodies of the dead cooked in pools of their own melted fat in sealed shelters like kilns or shriveled to small blackened bundles that littered the streets. Or worse, as the woman who was once the fifteen-year-old girl horribly recreates:

    Four-storey-high blocks of flats [the next day] were like glowing mounds of stone right down to the basement. Everything seemed to have melted and pressed the bodies away in front of it. Women and children were so charred as to be unrecognizable; those that had died through lack of oxygen were half-charred and recognizable. Their brains had tumbled from their burst temples and their insides from the soft parts under the ribs. How terribly these people must have died. The smallest children lay like fried eels on the pavement.

    Bomber Command killed at least 45,000 Germans that night, the majority of them old people, women and children.

    The bombing of Hamburg was hardly unique. It was one atrocity in a war of increasing atrocities.

    From http://www.amazon.com/The-Making-Atomic-Bomb-Anniversary/dp/1451677618
  • -Ner0--Ner0- Posts: 1,566Player
    Hamburg bombing

    Rare Battle For Berlin Footage
    HJbSf8Tt.jpg?2
    Think positive thoughts,
    say positive words,
    do positive actions
    and the positive grows.
  • SacchoSaccho Posts: 1,577Player
    I'll share something with a happier ending, too, after all the serious stuff.

    My grandmother was born in 1942 in northeastern Germany (now part of Poland, actually). Her family was forced to evacuate by the Russian army, sent to a camp near the Baltic Sea (not sure where) for several years, eventually tried to return home, and was then displaced by the Polish military and sent to a displaced persons camp outside Munich in 1946.

    In the past few years she's started sharing more of her childhood memories; here's one of them. She titled this "Soldiers".
    This day is a day that I am not too fond of. It is early summer and the people from the Red Cross are going to come soon and look at all the children, if you are too thin they send you to a summer camp in the mountains for fresh air and food lots of food for three weeks. To me this was silly, I had all the fresh air I needed here, food was a different story but I was very resourceful and a scavenger. I knew what to do to help out. I was a loner most of the time except for a boy who was a year older than me. We would never tell anyone else about our little adventures. At the summer camp you had to play games and all that food did not agree with most of us, if you know what I mean. People did not think about the effect all that food had on us and then we were sent back to nothing and that was hard.

    So with that on my mind and a frown on my face I was walking back from school, cutting through the fields. I came upon a group of farm workers huddled together talking in low voices, they did not see me, I overheard a few words but one sentence brought me to a screeching halt, my body tensed and my heart was beating in my throat. One worker said, “Did you hear soldiers are going to come to the camp on the hill and look at the children?” What did that mean? All the things I remembered about soldiers was bad, pain, meanness, torture, my little cousin’s death at their hands, my mother’s extreme fear when they entered the shelters at the prison and took certain women and teenage girls with them. I was too small to know what that all meant and my mother never spoke of anything except having to clean the soldier’s quarters…

    And now soldiers were coming here? Why? I didn’t know what to do, so I went to the after-school center like I was supposed to, to get my daily dose of cod liver oil, the most disgusting stuff you could ever have put into your mouth. It was a big one room barracks between the upper and lower camp. Adults were gathered there, smiling and excited and again I heard soldiers are coming. I thought why is everybody so excited and unafraid? And then we heard the trucks rumble up the gravel road. The trucks looked different, green with a white star, and the young men that jumped out of those trucks looked happy, their language was different, not Russian. Then I heard the word “Americans.” These young men brought food for us and small little gifts wrapped in tissue paper tied up with a piece of colored string. The young man that gave me my package smiled at me and sat down on the floor, waiting for me to open my gift. It was a package of Chiclet gum, small little white squares that had a strong smell. I had never seen gum before and did not know what to do with it so I moved on to a chocolate bar… same here, it was strange to me so I smiled and laid it aside. Then came my favorite, a coloring book all little kitten pictures and four colored pencils. I was in heaven. I think by this time the young man realized that I did not know what the rest was. He opened a piece of his gum and put it in his mouth, I heard the crunching sound as he started to chew, then as he was talking to me I smelled his breath and it smelled very fresh, now I know it was peppermint. Then he opened his chocolate, unwrapped it, I was amazed at the shiny silver paper inside, then again he put a piece of chocolate in his mouth and had me taste a piece. As the little piece melted in my mouth it released the most wonderful flavor. Just before he put the chocolate in his mouth he spit out the gum into a little piece of paper and discarded it. I wondered to myself what kind of food it was that you chew and spit it back out.

    After such a rough start of a day this day ended happy. And I remembered something my mother always told us: “No matter how sad or hard your day is, find something to smile about before you go to sleep and it will have been a day worthwhile. No matter how small a thing you find, a bird song, a flower blooming, a pretty cloud…” I still live by this philosophy.
  • Frig!d..Frig!d.. Posts: 41Player
    ^ Wow.
    My Great-Grandmother was a Hungarian Jew, she fled to America from a refugee camp in a small fishing boat.
  • SOPMODSOPMOD Posts: 230Player
    i live in Budapest,WW2 plane bombs not detonated,granade and gun depos get discovered on a monthly basis whenever the goverment decides to do some construction work within the city,or citizens do contruction work on their buildings.Whole blocks of people get evacuated for days till the bombs get disarmed on the spot depending on size or get shipped to a secure location to get blown up.70 years after the war...
    lets play a little guessing game,ideas what this is?

    B9iDqQCl.jpg

    http://imgur.com/B9iDqQC

    A Tiger 2 tank shell?

    Check this one out, truly a madman's fantasy. 80 cm's...
    https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwerer_Gustav#/media/File:80cm_Gustav_shell.jpg
  • m_hermannm_hermann Posts: 611Moderator
    I've split out a couple of replies, lets stick to the topic at hand.
  • SoldierBobSoldierBob Posts: 76Player
    m_hermann wrote: »
    I've split out a couple of replies, lets stick to the topic at hand.

    Thank god for moderators.

    Make love not War.
  • [1stCav]QuePasa^[1stCav]QuePasa^ Posts: 38Player
    Check this out.

  • Dem@nDem@n Posts: 564Player
    edited June 2015
    When i see destroyed bridges somehow always war comes to my mind.Probably because they are always among the first targets of bombings to cut off supplies and slow down troop movement.

    20140404magyarorszag-ujjaepitese-elotteutana.gif?w=666&h=444
    20140404magyarorszag-ujjaepitese-elotteutana2.gif?w=666&h=444
    20140404magyarorszag-ujjaepitese-elotteutana3.gif?w=666&h=444

  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 617Player
    edited June 2015
    And here we go again...just got evacuated from the office of my company because they found this morning a british 250kg bomb around 100 meters of my office.Directly infront of a gasstation.

    http://www.derwesten.de/staedte/essen/strassen-fuer-bombenentschaerfung-in-essen-ruettenscheid-sind-gesperrt-id10813962.html

    They waited with the evacuation of around 5000 people till a school nearby ended and they will start defusing right now.Daily business here :) Was horror to get home in this massive traffic jam.

    Lets see how long a german pro-bomb disposal expert needs for the job,he started to play with that baby at 17:08pm......
    AAPG is good!
  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 617Player
    Its done,29 minutes - thats skill :D
    AAPG is good!
  • SSKtidididiSSKtidididi Posts: 171Player
    edited June 2015
    I have a joke, but I will not make it public :D

    Flat, you know what :D
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